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Smithey Ironware

Smithey no. 12 Cast Iron Skillet
$200.00

The No. 12 Cast Iron Skillet by Smithey is where classical ironware meets modern technology. This 12-inch skillet, which is two inches wider than the No. 10, is the perfect tool for the home chef, whether cooking for family, friends or yourself. Inspired by admiration of vintage ironware and the pure intention of improving your cooking experience, this handsome 12-inch pan is constructed with two simple and functional pour spouts, and has a satin-smooth, vibrantly polished finish that not only gives you nonstick cooking ability but also provides an aesthetically appealing option for any and all kitchen ventures.

Shipping & Timing

Why we love it icon

You'll understand when you're preparing a sunny side egg, a salmon filet or whatever your favorite dish to prepare cast-iron-style happens to be. The smoothness of the surface makes a perfect, easy-to-season platform for cooking cornbread, vegetable pasta and much more. And with the story of how founder Isaac Morton found inspiration to revive the lost art of creating classic cast iron skillets and pans, not to mention the fact that these items just might outlive you, it's hard to find an item better suited for the stories you'll tell with breakfast, lunch, dinner or any other meal prepared in a Smithey.

There’s a reason people like the classics. Not only do they represent times we’ve moved beyond, for better or worse, but they also prove that those who came before us were dedicated to the idea that a thing worth doing is worth doing right.

This is the idea that inspired Isaac Morton, Smithey Ironware’s founder, to start his premium line of cast iron cookware from Charleston, South Carolina. And it explains why buying a Smithey is an investment in quality, craftsmanship, utility and appreciation for hard work. The basic process of creating the skillet begins at a small Indiana foundry, where pans that resemble mainstream cast iron skillets are made, then shipped to Charleston, arriving in a much grainier format than you’ll see in the finished product. At Morton’s shop, thick, heavy burrs on the metal surface are milled repeatedly before a grinding and polishing of the surface is done by hand. Following this, skillets are tumbled in a tub of rocks to achieve smoothness before they are seasoned with a thin layer of oil, packaged and shipped.

While Smithey is not the only player in this field, the fact that Morton still creates these skillets and pans with his own hands, whether you choose the satin-smooth 10-inch No. 10 or the slightly wider No. 12, makes the brand much more than just another creator of castaway cast iron for your kitchen. Sure, it's a time- and labor-intensive undertaking for him but those efforts produce a product that is simple to use, clean and keep on your stovetop whether warming up for a home-cooked meal or to admire in the meantime.

A Smithey’s surface is glassy smooth, similar to vintage cast iron cookware manufactured over 100 years ago. No corner cutting at Smithey, so you won’t find the granular, rough, sandpaper-like surface you may have experienced with other modern cast iron. By hand and machine, the team at Smithey has reinvented a method of polishing your cookware so that you enjoy a natural non-stick surface out-of-the-box. A Smithey’s surface is not only a delight to cook on, it is a handsome addition to your range. A touch of oil & over easy fried eggs are graceful again.

Material: Cast Iron 

Whether you’re thinking about purchasing your first piece of high-quality cookware made from premium cast iron, or you’ve already started a collection in your kitchen, there are clear benefits to using the precious metal for Southern cooking. There is also a bit of simple-but-dedicated work required to maintain and increase the quality and value of your cast iron cookware.

Read more about how to care for your cast iron

There’s a reason people like the classics. Not only do they represent times we’ve moved beyond, for better or worse, but they also prove that those who came before us were dedicated to the idea that a thing worth doing is worth doing right.

This is the idea that inspired Isaac Morton, Smithey Ironware’s founder, to start his premium line of cast iron cookware from Charleston, South Carolina. And it explains why buying a Smithey is an investment in quality, craftsmanship, utility and appreciation for hard work. The basic process of creating the skillet begins at a small Indiana foundry, where pans that resemble mainstream cast iron skillets are made, then shipped to Charleston, arriving in a much grainier format than you’ll see in the finished product. At Morton’s shop, thick, heavy burrs on the metal surface are milled repeatedly before a grinding and polishing of the surface is done by hand. Following this, skillets are tumbled in a tub of rocks to achieve smoothness before they are seasoned with a thin layer of oil, packaged and shipped.

While Smithey is not the only player in this field, the fact that Morton still creates these skillets and pans with his own hands, whether you choose the satin-smooth 10-inch No. 10 or the slightly wider No. 12, makes the brand much more than just another creator of castaway cast iron for your kitchen. Sure, it's a time- and labor-intensive undertaking for him but those efforts produce a product that is simple to use, clean and keep on your stovetop whether warming up for a home-cooked meal or to admire in the meantime.

A Smithey’s surface is glassy smooth, similar to vintage cast iron cookware manufactured over 100 years ago. No corner cutting at Smithey, so you won’t find the granular, rough, sandpaper-like surface you may have experienced with other modern cast iron. By hand and machine, the team at Smithey has reinvented a method of polishing your cookware so that you enjoy a natural non-stick surface out-of-the-box. A Smithey’s surface is not only a delight to cook on, it is a handsome addition to your range. A touch of oil & over easy fried eggs are graceful again.

Material: Cast Iron 

Whether you’re thinking about purchasing your first piece of high-quality cookware made from premium cast iron, or you’ve already started a collection in your kitchen, there are clear benefits to using the precious metal for Southern cooking. There is also a bit of simple-but-dedicated work required to maintain and increase the quality and value of your cast iron cookware.

Read more about how to care for your cast iron