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Blanc Creatives

Blanc Creatives 11-Inch Carbon Steel Roaster
$265.00

The Roaster by Blanc Creatives is perfect for cooking and beautiful for serving. This carbon steel roaster features a large cooking surface, with medium-high walls and two handles for efficiency and ease of transport. At 11 inches wide with a cooking surface of 9", this roaster is an ideal size for grill tops, the oven and cooking on the stove.

Not sure if you want Carbon Steel or Cast Iron?  Learn about the benefits of Carbon Steel.

Shipping & Timing

Why we love it icon

Blanc Creatives creates art in pan form. This piece of cookware is handmade by very cool guys in Charlottesville, Va., and while we love their story, we love the products they create even more.

"Since carbon steel offers comparable performance to cast iron, this large roaster is perfect for searing and roasting any chunk of beast." - Josh Conner, Online Buyer 

Though the Virginia-based blacksmith collective may not yet be a household name, Blanc Creatives has developed something of a cult following in the world of handmade heirloom kitchen products. Praised heavily by customers ranging from discerning home cooks to a variety of restaurants in the region and around the country, their high-quality carbon steel and copper cookware are worthy of your own pursuits of culinary art.

Many people have career fantasies in which they leave behind jobs for decidedly harder work, but a type of work they actually love. Not everyone makes such a leap of professional faith, and fewer still make a sustained living (much less a killing). But those who chase such creative callings usually have similar reasons why they chose their paths. They do it because they have to do it; nothing else will do. And there are few things more inspiring than when a group like Blanc Creatives finds success using its combined creative talents.

Blanc Creatives was started in 2009 by Georgia native Corry Blanc, who was raised in the Appalachian foothills of North Georgia, near Lake Lanier. With roots extending to New Orleans, Corry’s upbringing was greatly influenced of Southern food.

Read full story by Michael Jordan here.

The process by which Blanc Creatives makes their kitchenware is as artful as the pan itself. Each pan starts its journey as a flat, circular steel disc. The disc is pressed between a larger outer ring and a smaller inner die. This process raises the side walls and gives the steel a basic and rough pan shape. 

Following the preBlanc Creatives Forgess, the blank is placed in the forge and heated to a glowing red. Blacksmiths continue to shape the sidewalls with precise and rhythmic blows on the anvil. 

When the side walls are of even height and pitch, the pan returns to the press where the base is flattened under fifteen tons of pressure. Fine adjustments are made with a lever and hammer blows.

Assembly

Once the pan base has cooled, it is passed along to clean-up and assembly. The sharp edges of each pan are taken down with grinders and smoothed to an even radius. 

Handles are shaped on the anvil and hammered to match the curvature of the pan's sidewall. 

Holes are drilled and the handles are riveted in place. 

Clean Up & Seasoning

After the pan is fully assembled, it is placed in the sand blasting cabinet. Aluminum-oxide combined with high-pressure air blasts the surface of the metal removing mill scale and surface imperfections.

A wire-brush then polishes the surface, restoring the surface to an even and smooth finish.

At this stage the steel is very reactive to moisture and oxygen. Left in this state, the steel will begin to rust. To create a protective barrier,  the pans are placed in a kiln and baked at high temps for forty minutes.

Under this high temperature, the steel reacts and builds a layer of iron-oxide on its surface. This reaction produces the familiar blue-ish black tones of the final product. While the pans are still hot, coconut oil is applied and allowed to pull into the pores of the metal as it cools. 

Though the Virginia-based blacksmith collective may not yet be a household name, Blanc Creatives has developed something of a cult following in the world of handmade heirloom kitchen products. Praised heavily by customers ranging from discerning home cooks to a variety of restaurants in the region and around the country, their high-quality carbon steel and copper cookware are worthy of your own pursuits of culinary art.

Many people have career fantasies in which they leave behind jobs for decidedly harder work, but a type of work they actually love. Not everyone makes such a leap of professional faith, and fewer still make a sustained living (much less a killing). But those who chase such creative callings usually have similar reasons why they chose their paths. They do it because they have to do it; nothing else will do. And there are few things more inspiring than when a group like Blanc Creatives finds success using its combined creative talents.

Blanc Creatives was started in 2009 by Georgia native Corry Blanc, who was raised in the Appalachian foothills of North Georgia, near Lake Lanier. With roots extending to New Orleans, Corry’s upbringing was greatly influenced of Southern food.

Read full story by Michael Jordan here.

The process by which Blanc Creatives makes their kitchenware is as artful as the pan itself. Each pan starts its journey as a flat, circular steel disc. The disc is pressed between a larger outer ring and a smaller inner die. This process raises the side walls and gives the steel a basic and rough pan shape. 

Following the preBlanc Creatives Forgess, the blank is placed in the forge and heated to a glowing red. Blacksmiths continue to shape the sidewalls with precise and rhythmic blows on the anvil. 

When the side walls are of even height and pitch, the pan returns to the press where the base is flattened under fifteen tons of pressure. Fine adjustments are made with a lever and hammer blows.

Assembly

Once the pan base has cooled, it is passed along to clean-up and assembly. The sharp edges of each pan are taken down with grinders and smoothed to an even radius. 

Handles are shaped on the anvil and hammered to match the curvature of the pan's sidewall. 

Holes are drilled and the handles are riveted in place. 

Clean Up & Seasoning

After the pan is fully assembled, it is placed in the sand blasting cabinet. Aluminum-oxide combined with high-pressure air blasts the surface of the metal removing mill scale and surface imperfections.

A wire-brush then polishes the surface, restoring the surface to an even and smooth finish.

At this stage the steel is very reactive to moisture and oxygen. Left in this state, the steel will begin to rust. To create a protective barrier,  the pans are placed in a kiln and baked at high temps for forty minutes.

Under this high temperature, the steel reacts and builds a layer of iron-oxide on its surface. This reaction produces the familiar blue-ish black tones of the final product. While the pans are still hot, coconut oil is applied and allowed to pull into the pores of the metal as it cools.