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Korean bbq pork ribs
recipe

Korean-Style Barbecue Pork Ribs

Serves: 4 to 6

Hands On Time: 

Total Time: 

Ingredients

1 sweet onion, coarsely chopped
1 pear, cored and coarsely chopped
5 cloves garlic, peeled
1 (1-inch) piece ginger, sliced into thin coins
3/4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar
3/4 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons dark sesame oil
Freshly ground black pepper
2 rack St. Louis-style spare ribs or baby back ribs, halved
3 scallions, thinly sliced on an angle
1 tablespoon sesame seeds

Instructions

In a food processor, puree the onion, pear, garlic, ginger, brown sugar, water, soy sauce and sesame oil until smooth. Transfer to a resealable container or large zipper-lock bag. Season the ribs on both sides with pepper and then add them to the container with the sauce. Turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, turning the ribs periodically in the marinade.

Adjust the oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 300 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil and set a wire rack on the sheet. Spray the rack with nonstick oil spray.

Place the ribs side by side on the prepared baking sheet and transfer the marinade to a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat and then reduce the heat to a simmer.

Place the ribs in the oven and roast, brushing occasionally with the reserved marinade, until the ribs are done and a knife slides easily into the thickest part of the rib meat, 2 hours for baby back ribs and 3 hours for St. Louis spare ribs.

Remove from the oven and let the ribs rest, covered loosely in aluminum foil, for about 10 minutes, and then cut between the bones to separate the individual ribs. Serve immediately with the remaining reserved sauce for dipping. Garnish with thinly sliced green onions and sesame seeds.

Photo: Virginia Willis


About the recipe

When you're craving barbecue but don't want to spend hours outside tending the grill, do what Virginia Willis does and take the "grill" inside for low and slow oven-roasted ribs. In this recipe, Willis takes inspiration from Korean barbecue and makes a marinade similiar to that used with beef bulgogi.

When it comes to deciding what type of ribs to cook, you have basically two choices: spare ribs and baby back ribs. Spare ribs are cut from the ribs closest to the belly and are meaty, bony and thick. Baby back ribs are cut from where the rib meets the spine. They’re only called “baby” because they are shorter and thinner than spareribs; they don’t refer to the age of the pig. Either will work in this recipe. Baby back ribs are leaner and take less time to cook.

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