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Anne Byrn's eggnog

Danielle Atkins

Anne Byrn's Classic Southern Eggnog

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8 creative ways to make your best-ever eggnog

Whether you prefer a classic mixture of eggs, cream and brandy, or love mixing it up with every seasonal ingredient under the sun, we've got the eggnog recipe for you. Pour a big cup of holiday cheer with these eight eggnog recipes from our Southern Kitchen and other friends around the web.

Anne Byrn's Classic Southern Eggnog
If you shudder at the thought of adding caramel and peppermint to your eggnog, this classic Southern recipe from Anne Byrn will be right up your alley. Only containing eggs, sugar, cream, bourbon and a touch of freshly grated nutmeg, this recipe is bare bones but perfect in every way. For the best texture, whip the egg yolks and whites separately before folding it all together. Ladle into cut crystal glasses and serve.
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Alton Brown's Aged Eggnog
Yep, aged eggnog. Alton Brown says that aging the nog for a couple of weeks will mellow out the boozy flavors, lending the final drink a mellow and smooth flavor. (Not to worry about saftey, at this high of an alcohol content, the mixture is more sterile than the boxed stuff at the grocery store.) Brown writes that he is also very particular about his dairy mixture, as well as the drink's final texture, so if you're looking for a Good Eats-approved nog, make sure to pay close attention to the ingredient list.
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5-Minute Blender Eggnog
For a far, faster variation, try this 5-minute eggnog made in a blender. Blogger Amanda, of The Chunky Chef, makes it as easy as 1-2-3 to whip up a cup of this holiday classic. The high speed of the blender will give the drink a lighter, airy texture than those made by whipping the yolks and whites separately. Age it overnight if desired.
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Peppermint Eggnog
Get the kids in the kitchen for this virgin nog jazzed up with a double dose of pepperment. This recipe, from Martha Stewart Kids, uses peppermint extract in the eggnog with crushed candies on the rim for a festive touch. A few ounces of white chocolate moves the drink into the indulgent dessert category and will keep all of your kiddos happy.
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Grandma's Old-Fashioned Drinking Custard
Essentially a cooked version of unwhipped eggnog, this "drinking custard" is as Southern as it gets, and is great for anyone wary of uncooked eggs. This recipe is written sans booze, but feel free to stir in a tipple or two of sherry, bourbon or brandy. 
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Rum-Coco Nog
If you're tired of traditional flavors, this roundup of seven creative variations of eggnog in the LA Times is a perfect resource. Our favorite? Rum-coco nog, made with rich, dark rum and coconut milk. Vanilla, cinnamon and allspice complement the flavors of the rum.
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Homemade Salted Caramel Eggnog
Anyone with a sweet tooth will love this salted caramel-filled twist on eggnog from The Cookie Rookie. This twist is made easy with store-bought caramel syrup and an electric mixer. If you're looking to make this drink into an adults-only treat, stir in rum, which will pair best with the salty-sweet drink.
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Cashew Nut Nog
Dairy-free nog lovers rejoice! This cashew-, hazelnut- and coconut-nog from Bon Appetit is the perfect warm drink for lactose-intolerant partygoers. In addition to untraditional, but still delicious, milk, the recipe includes a generous hand with warm spice and a light hand with the sugar.
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Kate Williams is the editor-in-chief of Southern Kitchen. She is also an on-air personality on our podcast, Sunday Supper. She has been working in food since 2009, including a two-year stint at America’s Test Kitchen. Kate has been a personal chef, recipe developer, the food editor at a hyperlocal news site in Berkeley and a freelance writer for publications such as Serious Eats, Anova Culinary, The Cook’s Cook and Berkeleyside. Kate is also an avid rock climber and occasionally dabbles in long-distance running. She makes a mean peach pie and likes her bourbon neat.

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